79f58-inspiring-photo

If You Don’t Want to Work, It Doesn’t Mean You’re Lazy

As of late I’ve been reading a lot about alternative lifestyle design.  If you’re unsure of what that means, think of an average lifestyle (American lifestyle), then think of an alternative to it – that’s it!  Instead of working a 9 to 5 job to pay off your mortgage and take two weeks a year for vacation, find a way to support yourself being location independent and move wherever you’d like whenever you want.  Sounds ideal to some, crazy to others, but it’s possible for most.  However, while reading about this topic I’ve begun to wonder what it truly means to be lazy.

If I were to tell someone that I didn’t want a job and wanted to work the minimum amount of hours a week to support a lifestyle that I loved, their likely response would be that I’m a lazy, unrealistic, and entitled $%*@.  Unrealistic and entitled, maybe.  But that’s a whole other topic.  Lazy, though, I must disagree.  If I wanted what I just mentioned but didn’t work towards achieving it, yep, that’s lazy.  On the other hand though, what if I pushed unwaveringly towards achieving my goal of retiring at age 28 and maintaining a minimal “work” schedule while being able to travel, read, write, and love?  Is that lazy?

The shift in my understanding of the word lazy has been towards now viewing it as complacency towards one’s aspirations – or even better, a shyness towards mental labor over physical labor.  It doesn’t matter if you wake up at 5:00am to dig holes till midnight – if you hate what you are doing but not motivated enough to make a change, doesn’t that make you lazy?

One thing that has always cracked me up about school is that we always refer to good students as the ones who study all the time.  The kids who refuse to go out the week before an exam so they can bury their nose into textbooks and decimate their liver with coffee while everyone else opts for vodka.  Some kids who do this get straight A’s, some B’s, and some are more hit or miss.  But all of them we’d consider good students.

Call me crazy, but I think the good students are the ones who can roll into an exam after a two day club bender and still pull out a B or A.  And for a simple reason, I care WAYYYY more about results than intentions.  Therefore, if one student puts in a weeks worth of studying and another puts in a cocktails worth, meanwhile they achieve the same results, the non-studier is a better student because he works much more efficiently.

This is how I want to structure my life (not constantly partying).  I want to find ways to most efficiently achieve high results so that I can enjoy as much time as possible to pursue passions.  It’s fine to disagree, but I believe figuring out a way to do so takes a much less lazy person than it takes to perform  any job you could ever spend your life working.

-Sepp

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *